STEVE JOBS LIBRO PDF

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ALBERT EINSTEIN, THIS IS THE EXCLUSIVE. BIOGRAPHY OF STEVE JOBS. Based on more than forty interviews with Jobs conducted over two years—as well . Steve Jobs and the story of Apple. People and places. Introduction. Chapter 1: Crazy about electronics. Chapter 2: The birth of Apple. Chapter 3: A computer in. EXCLUSIVE BIOGRAPHY OF STEVE JOBS. Based on more than forty interviews with Jobs con ducted over two years—as well as interviews with more than a.


Steve Jobs Libro Pdf

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Steve Jobs by Walter Isaacson - FROM THE AUTHOR OF THE BESTSELLING BIOGRAPHIES OF BENJAMIN FRANKLIN AND ALBERT EINSTEIN, THIS IS THE . Editorial Reviews. Review. Reseña: «El fallecimiento de Steve Jobs ha precipitado un alud de libros sobre su figura. De todos ellos, la aproximación más. The Zen of Steve monpaysofchlesspi.ml - Download as PDF File .pdf) or read online. Steve Jobs - Biography . monpaysofchlesspi.ml

That focus allowed him to say no. He got Apple back on track by cutting all except a few core products. He made devices simpler by eliminating buttons, software simpler by eliminating features, and interfaces simpler by eliminating options. He attributed his ability to focus and his love of simplicity to his Zen training.

It honed his appreciation for intuition, showed him how to filter out anything that was distracting or unnecessary, and nurtured in him an aesthetic based on minimalism.

Unfortunately his Zen training never quite produced in him a Zen-like calm or inner serenity, and that too is part of his legacy. He was often tightly coiled and impatient, traits he made no effort to hide.

Most people have a regulator between their mind and mouth that modulates their brutish sentiments and spikiest impulses. Not Jobs.

Steve Jobs

He made a point of being brutally honest. This made him charismatic and inspiring, yet also, to use the technical term, an asshole at times. Jobs claimed it was the former. But I think he actually could have controlled himself, if he had wanted. When he hurt people, it was not because he was lacking in emotional awareness. Quite the contrary: He could size people up, understand their inner thoughts, and know how to relate to them, cajole them, or hurt them at will.

The nasty edge to his personality was not necessary. It hindered him more than it helped him.

But it did, at times, serve a purpose. Polite and velvety leaders, who take care to avoid bruising others, are generally not as effective at forcing change. Dozens of the colleagues whom Jobs most abused ended their litany of horror stories by saying that he got them to do things they never dreamed possible.

He designed the Mac after appreciating the power of graphical interfaces in a way that Xerox was unable to do, and he created the iPod after grasping the joy of having a thousand songs in your pocket in a way that Sony, which had all the assets and heritage, never could accomplish.

Some leaders push innovations by being good at the big picture. Others do so by mastering details. Jobs did both, relentlessly. As a result he launched a series of products over three decades that transformed whole industries.

Was he smart? No, not exceptionally. Instead, he was a genius. His imaginative leaps were instinctive, unexpected, and at times magical.

He was, indeed, an example of what the mathematician Mark Kac called a magician genius, someone whose insights come out of the blue and require intuition more than mere mental processing power.

Like a pathfinder, he could absorb information, sniff the winds, and sense what lay ahead.

Steve Jobs thus became the greatest business executive of our era, the one most certain to be remembered a century from now. History will place him in the pantheon right next to Edison and Ford.

More than anyone else of his time, he made products that were completely innovative, combining the power of poetry and processors. And he was able to infuse into its DNA the design sensibilities, perfectionism, and imagination that make it likely to be, even decades from now, the company that thrives best at the intersection of artistry and technology. Excerpt 4 The difference that Jony has made, not only at Apple but in the world, is huge.

He is a wickedly intelligent person in all ways. He understands business concepts, marketing concepts. He picks stuff up just like that, click. Best quote: "Towards thee I roll, thou all-destroying but unconquering whale; to the last I grapple with thee; from hell's heart I stab at thee; for hate's sake I spit my last breath at thee. Unlike most such authors, Grove delves as deeply into his failures as his successes.

Fun factoid: Apple is the only PC company that has successfully migrated an operating system from one CPU architecture to another completely different architecture. Best quote: "The sad news is, nobody owes you a career. Your career is literally your own business.

You own it as a sole proprietor. You have one employee: yourself. You are in competition with millions of similar businesses: millions of other employees all over the world. You need to accept ownership of your career, your skills, and the timing of your moves. It is your responsibility to protect this personal business of yours from harm and to position it to benefit from changes in the environment.

Nobody else can do that for you. Best quote: "When faced with a disruptive technology, people and processes in a mainstream organization cannot be expected to allocate freely the critical financial and human resources needed to carve out a strong position in the small, emerging market. It is very difficult for a company whose cost structure is tailored to compete in high-end markets to be profitable in low-end markets as well.

Creating an independent organization, with a cost structure honed to achieve profitability at the low margins characteristic of most disruptive technologies, is the only viable way for established firms to harness this principle. Fun factoid: I put this on the list because Steve Jobs personally told me that he liked it. Best quote: "A manager went to the master programmer and showed him the requirements document for a new application.

The manager asked the master: "How long will it take to design this system if I assign five programmers to it? How long will it take if I assign 10 programmers to it? Fun factoid: Prior to the publication of this book in , Zen Buddhism was virtually unknown in the United States. As an early cultural icon who endorsed it, Steve Jobs definitely helped to popularize it.

Best quote: "Even though you try to put people under control, it is impossible. You cannot do it. The best way to control people is to encourage them to be mischievous. Then they will be in control in a wider sense.

To give your sheep or cow a large spacious meadow is the way to control him. Sign up and get a free eBook!

Steve Jobs By Walter Isaacson. Price may vary by retailer.

About The Book. Excerpt 1 His personality was reflected in the products he created.

His passions, perfectionism, demons, desires, artistry, devilry, and obsession for control were integrally connected to his approach to business and the products that resulted.

His silences could be as searing as his rants; he had taught himself to stare without blinking. At other times it could be terrifying, such as when he was fulminating about Google or Microsoft ripping off Apple.

More books from this author: Walter Isaacson

This intensity encouraged a binary view of the world. You were either one or the other, sometimes on the same day. The same was true of products, ideas, even food: As a result, any perceived flaw could set off a rant. His quest for perfection led to his compulsion for Apple to have end-to-end control of every product that it made.

This ability to integrate hardware and software and content into one unified system enabled him to impose simplicity. Excerpt 2 For Jobs, belief in an integrated approach was a matter of righteousness.

Their lives are crowded; they have other things to do than think about how to integrate their computers and devices. But in a world filled with junky devices, inscrutable error messages, and annoying interfaces, it led to astonishing products marked by beguiling user experiences.

Using an Apple product could be as sublime as walking in one of the Zen gardens of Kyoto that Jobs loved, and neither experience was created by worshipping at the altar of openness or by letting a thousand flowers bloom.

He would set priorities, aim his laser attention on them, and filter out distractions. If something engaged him—the user interface for the original Macintosh, the design of the iPod and iPhone, getting music companies into the iTunes Store—he was relentless.

But if he did not want to deal with something—a legal annoyance, a business issue, his cancer diagnosis, a family tug—he would resolutely ignore it. That focus allowed him to say no.

Steve Jobs La Biografia Ufficiale.pdf

He got Apple back on track by cutting all except a few core products. He made devices simpler by eliminating buttons, software simpler by eliminating features, and interfaces simpler by eliminating options. He attributed his ability to focus and his love of simplicity to his Zen training. It honed his appreciation for intuition, showed him how to filter out anything that was distracting or unnecessary, and nurtured in him an aesthetic based on minimalism.

Unfortunately his Zen training never quite produced in him a Zen-like calm or inner serenity, and that too is part of his legacy. He was often tightly coiled and impatient, traits he made no effort to hide. Most people have a regulator between their mind and mouth that modulates their brutish sentiments and spikiest impulses. Not Jobs. He made a point of being brutally honest. This made him charismatic and inspiring, yet also, to use the technical term, an asshole at times.

Jobs claimed it was the former. But I think he actually could have controlled himself, if he had wanted. When he hurt people, it was not because he was lacking in emotional awareness.

Steve Jobs

Quite the contrary:Jonathan Ive, known to all as Jony, was planning to quit. The photograph was taken by Albert Watson. This is the best policy. The humor is that finally when you have the power to move the mountain, you are the person who placed it there--so there the mountain stays. He was unbound. It helped give the owner a playful emotional connection to the pen.